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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
 
     Often misdiagnosed as flu or other viral infections, CFS is 3 times more prevalent in women than in men, and primarily affects young adults between the ages of 20-40. The two main distinguishing factors:Persistent fatigue that does resolve with bed rest and results in a reduction of daily activity by 50% or more. The presence of other chronic conditions, including psychiatric should be ruled out.
 
     CFS is typically caused by a depletion of the endocrine system (adrenal, thyroid, and pituitary galnds) which controls hormonal levels in the body. It is essential to cleanse out all the toxins which are interfering with their proper function. CFS can be also caused by anemia, depression, fibromyalgia, hepatitis, and Lyme disease, so you should get yourself checked out by a health care professional.
 
Symptoms:
Symptoms include aching muscles and joints, anxiety, depression, difficulty concentrating, fever, headaches, intestinal problems, irritability, jaundice, loss of appetite, muscle spasms, sensitivity to light and heat, sleep disturbances, swollen glands, sore throat, temporary memory loss, and most of all, extreme and often disabling fatigue.
 

Recommendations:

  • B vitamins are known to be the energy vitamins as well as other important nutrients to feed starving cells and help the body heal.  We suggest a high quality whole food supplement, like VITAFORCE™ that is complete and made from whole foods.  Make sure you know what you are getting from the nutritional label.
  • Eat a well balanced diet of 50% or more raw foods and fresh "live" (just squeezed) juices. This will give the body highly nutritious and easily absorbable whole foods which gives much more energy and builds immunity.
  • Eat foods rich in the B vitamins, particularly vitamin B1 or Thiamine; brown rice, legumes, peas, kelp, dulse, plums, spirulina, raisins, broccoli, asparagus, and most nuts. Vitamin B1 has been found to significantly decrease the number of fatigue complaints in athletes. -Metabolic Pr Brain Dis, 11(1), march 1996, p. 95-106
  • Consume at least 8 glasses of distilled water throughout the day (not at meals) to help flush out toxins and reduce muscle pain.
  • Natural Vitamin C–  In one study, there was found to be an inverse relationship between Vitamin C and fatigue. In other words, those with the lowest intake of Vitamin C reported twice as many fatigue symptoms as those with the highest Vitamin C consumption levels. We suggest a high quality whole food supplement, like VITAFORCE™ that is complete and made from whole foods.  Make sure you know what you are getting from the nutritional label.-Journal of the AmericaGeriatric Society, 24(3), 1976, p. 136-137
  • Get plenty of rest and do not over-exert yourself.
  • Get at least 15-30 minutes of fresh air and sunshine (if possible) a day. This will help to re-invigorate you.

Things to Avoid:

  • Do not eat shellfish, fried foods, junk foods, processed foods, stimulants (coffee, soda, sugar) or white flour products.
  • Avoid stress as much as possible.

References:

1) James F. Balch, M.D, Phyllis A. Balch, C.N.C, "Prescription for Nutritional Healing," (1997)

2) M. Suzuki & Y. Itokawa, "Effects of Thiamine (Vitamin B1) Supplementation on Exercise-induced Fatigue," Metabolic Pr Brain Dis, 11(1), march 1996, p. 95-106

3) E. Cheraskin, et al., "Daily Vitamin C Consumption and Fatiguability," Journal of the AmericaGeriatric Society, 24(3), 1976, p. 136-137