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Arthritis

Arthritis
 
     More than fifty million Americans suffer from arthritis, the inflammation of one or more joints. This condition affects the body's movable joints, or synovial, joints. Joints of the body are found at the knees, wrists, elbows, fingers, toes, hips, and shoulders. The neck and back also have joints between the bones of the spine.
Osteoarthritis is usually caused by a number an injury or defect in the protein that makes up the cartilage surrounding the ends of the bones. It is associated with the wear and tear of aging. This form of arthritis usually occurs in people 40 years of age or older.
 
     Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune disorder in which the body improperly identifies the synovial membrane and attacks it, replacing the damaged tissue with scar tissue. This form of arthritis frequently occurs in people under forty, including young children. While Osteoarthritis affects individual joints, Rheumatoid Arthritis affects all of the joints in the body.
 
     Infectious Arthritis can be caused bacterial/viral/fungal infection of a joint. Usually, the infecting organism travels through the bloodstream to the joint from an infection elsewhere in the body. Symptoms include: redness, swelling, pain, and tenderness in the affected joint accompanied by systemic symptoms of infection such as fever, chills, and body aches.
 
     High protein foods (Animal Foods- meat and dairy) are generally high in purines, which are the primary building blocks of our genetic code material , DNA and RNA. Proteins break down to form uric acid (not urea). Too much protein intake (60 grams or above daily) leads to the collection of uric acid in the joints which leads to arthritis. Also, if the blood is too acidic, this may cause the cartilage in the joints to dissolve, the joints lose their normal smooth sliding motion, the bones rub together, the joints become inflamed and this causes pain. Blood acidity is most often caused by excess protein from animal foods. For more on this, please see acidosis.
 

Symptoms:

Pain, swelling, stiffness, deformity, inflammation, redness, and/or a diminished range of motion.

Recommendations:

  • Eat more sulfur containing foods such as asparagus, garlic and onions. Sulfur is needed for the repair and rebuilding of bone, cartilage, connective tissue and aids in the absorption of calcium.
  • Boron can be of great benefit; supplementation of boron led to significatnt improvements inpatients suffering from arthritis. Envirn Health Perspect, 102 (Suppl 7), Novemember 1994, p.83-85.
  • Consume organic (if available), unrefined primrose oil to supply essential fatty acids that increase the production of anti-inflammatory prostaglandins.
  • Get regular, moderate exercise as this is essential for reducing pain and retarding joint deterioration. Bicycle riding, walking and water exercise are good choices.
  • Vitamin D is needed for proper bone formation. Spend time outdoors for fresh air and sunshine and take VITAFORCE™ daily.
  • The treatment with a daily dose of 150 mg of Vitamin C over a period of 20 days reduced arthritic swelling, increased pain tolerance... Journal of American Podiatry Medical Association, 80(8), August 1990, p. 414-418.) For an all natural whole food source of Vitamin C, take two servings of VITAFORCE™ daily.

Things to Avoid:

  • All animal foods (dairy, meat, fish, etc...) as this may cause the cartilage in the joints to dissolve, the joints lose their normal smooth sliding motion, the bones rub together, the joints become inflamed and this causes pain.
  • Caffeine, salt, tobacco, fried foods, junk foods, and sugar.
  • Do not take iron supplements or a multi-vitamin containing iron. Iron is supected of being involved in pain, swelling, and joint destruction. Good sources of iron include blackstrap molasses, dark leafy greens, wheatgrass, broccoli, and peas.

References:

1) James F. Balch, M.D, Phyllis A. Balch, C.N.C, "Prescription for Nutritional Healing," (1997)

2) (R.H. Davis, et al., "Vitamin C influence on Localized Adjuvant Arthritis," Journal of American Podiatry Medical Association, 80(8), August 1990, p. 414-418.)

3) R.E. Newnham, "Essential of Boron for healthy Bones and Joints," Envirn Health Perspect, 102 (Suppl 7), Novemember 1994, p.83-85

4) E. Bien, "The Relation of Dietary Nitrogen Consumption to the Rate of Uric Acid Synthesis in the Normal and Gouty Men," Journal of Clinicaal Invest (1953):778